Collective leadership for high-quality careers support


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Recruiters take action to support #futuretalent

The foreword to the Sutton Trust report ‘Advancing Ambitions’ highlights the positive impacts of high-quality career guidance in schools and colleges: improved attendance, better GCSE results and wiser university choices. But it also offers another more straightforward reason why we should have a high standard of career guidance in every school and college: not doing so places non-privileged young people at an even greater disadvantage in their ability to access the best opportunities.

Access to education and career opportunities for all young people and improving social mobility are well known objectives in business and public policy. The challenges too are well known, with stakeholders across the education, skills and business communities actively involved in a wide range of initiatives to address the issues we have with helping all young people make better, more informed choices about their futures. Ahead of Professions Week (10-16 November 2014) this article reflects on employer involvement in careers support for young people and how essential a partnership approach is to securing #futuretalent for the UK’s competitiveness.

Already in 2010 the Recruitment and Employment Confederation (REC) convened a Youth Employment Taskforce led by Baroness Prosser OBE in light of employer concerns about youth unemployment. With a brief to consider what policy makers, employers and educators could do to help to get more young people into work at the height of the recession, the Taskforce recognised the important role that recruiters have to play given their understanding of the jobs market.

The REC’s Youth Employment Charter provides a focal point to support its members who want to do more to help the next generation of talent. Four years on since its launch, REC members have helped over 20,000 young people. The four case examples below show what some recruiters are doing to develop the #futuretalent our economy needs.

Pertemps

  • Developed a dedicated programme called ‘Rising Stars’ to provide young people with experience in many different aspects of the business, with the desired outcome of creating tomorrow’s outstanding recruitment consultants.
  • Visited schools, colleges and universities to offer one-to-one advice or host recruitment events to help young people with the knowledge for trying to find work.

Firebird Training Ltd

  • Worked actively with young people to offer personal coaching.
  • Recruited interns and work experience students into the business on a regular basis.
  • A division of the company (www.inspiredyouths.co.uk) runs programmes in schools to help young people find employment or set up their own business.

SEL Resourcing

  • Worked with the National Apprenticeship Service and the RICS to identify apprenticeships available in Surveying.
  • Worked with the Chartered Surveyor Training Trust (CSTT) to identify whether the current apprenticeship framework is suitable for the surveying industry.
  • Partnered with CSTT to establish relationships with local schools to develop apprenticeships in the process engineering sectors.

The Plus Team

  • Provided seminars to over 600 young people, primarily aimed at the NEET group to share insider tips and techniques to help them secure work quickly.
  • Supported Welfare to Work providers at events. Topics cover on-line CV applications, how the recruitment parsing software works or how to prepare people to deliver successful interviews, including understanding the CBI score system.

 

Recruiters clearly have a role to play in helping young people understand the job search process. The challenge for recruiters and the careers sector, schools and colleges is ensuring that these many positive actions are embedded as part of a well-planned careers programme in schools and colleges.

The reality is that addressing youth unemployment and smoothing the education to employment transition for young people at a level of scale that is needed can only be achieved where all the actors involved understand the need for partnership working, recognise their distinctive and complementary contributions and ensure greater co-ordination of effort at a local level within a ‘national organising framework’. Hence the Careers Alliance has established a #futuretalent campaign to affirm that working together within a well-planned careers programme, employers and career professionals can provide far more effective help to young people than either could do on their own.

We must act now as the bald truth is beyond comprehension – if the levels of youth unemployment remain unchanged over the next decade, it is estimated that the net cost to the Treasury will be approximately £28 billion (Source: Acevo).

We invite employers and industry bodies to join the Careers Alliance #futuretalent campaign to ensure we achieve a significant step-change in how we prepare young people for the world of work.

 

Notes:

  1. The #futuretalent campaign by the Careers Alliance is supported by over 50 large employers, professional bodies, Sector Skills Councils, and education organisations, including:
  • Atkins, Capgemini, Deloitte, National Grid, Siemens, Wates;
  • the Sutton Trust, the ACCA, the Bar Council, the Chartered Management Institute, the ICAEW;
  • the EEF (the manufacturers organisation), the BVCA, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Federation for Industry Sector Skills & Standards, Creative & Cultural Skills;
  • ManPowerGroup and the Recruitment and Employment Confederation amongst many others.
  1. The full list of #futuretalent supporters can be found here.
  2. The REC is the professional body for the UK’s £26 billion recruitment industry. With over 3,500 recruitment businesses in membership, it represents 80% of the industry by turnover. The REC aims to promote the positive contribution that high quality recruitment can make to UK plc.
  3. More information on the REC’s Youth Employment Taskforce and more case examples of how recruiters are helping young people can be found here.
  4. Professions Week is organised by Access to the Professions, a network of 19 professional bodies – the REC is one of the member organisations. Professions Week aims to increase awareness of the range and variety of potential employment options the professions have to offer young people, and encourages likeminded organisations to recruit people from a diverse range of disciplines and backgrounds.
  5. The list of professional bodies that are members of Access to the Professions includes: AAT, ACCA, ATT, CII, CIOT, Cilex, CIMA, CIPA, CIPD, CIPP, CIPS, CISI, CMI, IAB, ICAEW, IfL, ILM, PARN, REC.

 

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What about jobs for the next generation?

BN13A CoverNever mind youth unemployment now, what about the next generation?

A new report on youth unemployment titled ‘Precarious Futures’ by the UKCES confirms our concerns about labour market opportunities for future generations. TUC Secretary General, Frances O’Grady said recently that job prospects for many young people have deteriorated alarmingly.

Although improving, we know that only one in four employers offer work experience placements to young people in education and just 15% of employers have or offer apprenticeships to young people.

Structural changes in the labour market mean that young people are competing with older and more experienced workers, who have been forced to trade down for the lower and mid level jobs that young people would normally take.

The Careers Alliance has launched a #futuretalent campaign backed by over 50 employers, professional bodies and education organisations, including Atkins, Capgemini, Deloitte, National Grid, Siemens, Wates, the ACCA, the Bar Council, the Chartered Management Institute, the ICAEW, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Federation for Industry Sector Skills & Standards, Creative & Cultural Skills, and the Recruitment and Employment Confederation amongst many others.

It is not enough for employers to just offer more work opportunities for young people now. The Royal Academy of Engineering’s report on “Jobs and Growth” forecasts that the UK economy will require 830,000 professional scientists, engineers and technologists over the next decade alone. There is a long term skills issue that must be addressed by bringing education and training and the labour market closer together.

This is why employers and the Careers Alliance are calling for collaborative action between professional careers advisers, employers and schools and colleges in providing careers advice and guidance to young people by:

  1. Highlighting the importance of careers education and guidance in schools and colleges.
  2. Framing employer contributions as part of professionally managed careers programmes and not as ad hoc initiatives.
  3. Affirming that, working together within a planned careers programme, employers and career professionals can provide far more effective help to young people than either could do on their own.

 

The #futuretalent campaign challenges current Government policies by highlighting the importance of collaborative action in career guidance. This contrasts with the Government’s latest Statutory Guidance to schools which has emphasised contributions from employers and people in jobs to inspire and motivate young people in schools and colleges about the world of work, but makes little reference to the role of careers advisers, nor explains how such links between employers and schools and colleges can best be brokered.

The Careers Alliance, which is made up of more than twenty of the country’s largest skills and education organisations, reports that the inputs from employers and careers advisers need to be integrated into well-planned careers programmes in schools.

Commenting on the campaign, Dame Ruth Silver, Chair of the Careers Alliance, said: ‘There remains a disconnect between education and the world of work. Our joint call with employers shows that collaborative action is the best solution; employers say they can’t do it all on their own. Employers endorse this call by the Careers Alliance for partnership working to get careers guidance in schools and colleges right.’

Toby Peyton-Jones, Director of Human Resources at Siemens plc said: ‘Siemens would like to fully endorse the call for collaborative action by the Careers Sector Stakeholders Alliance by adding our support for driving structured and sustained collaboration between schools and employers in preparing young people for the world of work.’

Steve Holliday, CEO at National Grid said: ‘We know employers can play a more active role educating school children about the world of work. We would like to add our support to the Careers Alliance statement about improving the links between employers, schools and career advisory services to lead to better informed young people considering their career options.’

 

CSSA BN13A Employer Support for CSSA Statement

What of jobs for the next generation? CSSA #futuretalent campaign Press Release 23-06-14


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CSSA Briefing Note 13A

Employers say partnership working the only way to get careers guidance in schools and colleges right

BN13A CoverA joint statement by the Careers Alliance is published today with the support of a wide range of employers and sector bodies, including Atkins, Capgemini, Deloitte, National Grid, Siemens, Wates, the ACCA, the Bar Council, the Chartered Management Institute, the ICAEW, the Royal Academy of Engineering, the Federation for Industry Sector Skills & Standards, Creative & Cultural Skills, and the Recruitment and Employment Confederation amongst many others.

It calls for collaborative action between professional careers advisers, employers and schools and colleges in providing careers advice and guidance to young people by:

  1. Highlighting the importance of careers education and guidance in schools and colleges.
  2. Framing employer contributions as part of professionally managed careers programmes and not as ad hoc initiatives.
  3. Affirming that, working together within a planned careers programme, employers and career professionals can provide far more effective help to young people than either could do on their own.

Employers, professional bodies and Sector Skills Councils have challenged Government policies by supporting the Careers Alliance statement. This contrasts with the Government’s latest Statutory Guidance to schools which has emphasised contributions from employers and people in jobs to inspire and motivate young people in schools and colleges about the world of work, but makes little reference to the role of careers advisers, nor explains how such links between employers and schools and colleges can best be brokered.

Getting the balance right beyond inspiration
Commenting on the campaign, Dame Ruth Silver, Chair of the Careers Alliance, said: ‘There remains a disconnect between education and the world of work. Our joint call with employers shows that collaborative action is the best solution; employers say they can’t do it all on their own. Employers endorse this call by the Careers Alliance for partnership working to get careers guidance in schools and colleges right.’

Professor Tony Watts, a leading international expert on career guidance said: ‘If employer contributions are to be effective, they require logistical support, curriculum space, and receptive schools and young people. They also need to be an integral part of well-planned careers programmes.’

Commenting on the Careers Alliance statement, Dr Tessa Stone, CEO of Brightside and Chair of the Bridge Group, said: ‘The employers we work with are actively engaged in working with schools and colleges. They value the role of professional careers advisers in managing careers education and guidance programmes within schools which incorporate and support the contributions of employers and people at work, so enhancing their value and ensuring their effectiveness.’

The Careers Alliance report concludes that employers (and people at work) and careers advisers both have distinctive and complementary contributions to make to the career development and career planning of young people. Working together, within a planned programme of careers education and guidance, they can provide far more effective help to young people than either could do on their own.

CSSA BN13A Employer Support for CSSA Statement


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Still time to book to attend the Careers 50/50 conference

Excellent opportunity to celebrate 50 years of world-leading careers research, innovation and support.

Adventures in Career Development

There are still places available to book onto the Careers 50/50 conference.

On 14 -15 July, CRAC, is celebrating its 50th anniversary by hosting a major careers event in partnership with NICEC (the National Institute for Career Education and Counselling) www.crac.org.uk/5050. The event will celebrate the work undertaken by CRAC, Vitae and Professor Tony Watts, co-founder of CRAC and Director of NICEC,1975-2001 over the last 50 years.

CRAC was set up in 1964 to improve the quality of careers work and career support in schools and to act as a link between the worlds of education and of work. NICEC was for many years a research and development organisation supported by CRAC ran its first project supporting transitions of doctoral researchers to industry in 1968. Over the last 50 years, CRAC has led a wide-ranging set of innovations in connecting students, researchers and employers, careers information and learning.

The celebratory event will reflect on the…

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Free copies: Evaluating the impact of career management skills module and internship programme within a university business school

Adventures in Career Development

I’ve recently published an article entitle Evaluating the impact of career management skills module and internship programme within a university business school in the British Journal of Guidance and Counselling.

I’m able to give away 50 free views of the article. So if you don’t work in a university and would like to engage with our research follow the link to pick up your free copy. First come, first served

I want my free copy of “Evaluating the impact of career management skills programme”

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CSSA Press statement: Partnerships to get careers guidance working

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

26 February 2014

Partnerships needed to get careers guidance in schools and colleges
working

More than ‘inspiration’ needed
Following the recent Ofsted report on careers guidance in schools which found that ‘…links with employers were the weakest aspect of career guidance in the 60 schools visited’, this new report from the Careers Alliance highlights the importance of collaboration between professional careers advisers, employers and schools and colleges in providing careers advice and guidance to young people.

This call for collaborative action is made by the Careers Alliance, which is made up of more than twenty of the country’s largest skills and education organisations.

It comes at a time when the Government’s recent Inspiration Vision Statement alongside its Careers Guidance Action Plan have placed emphasis on contributions from employers and people in jobs to inspire and motivate young people in schools and colleges about the world of work, but make little reference to the role of careers advisers, nor explain how such links between employers and schools and colleges can best be brokered.

More is needed than ‘inspiring young people’. Careers Alliance Convenor, Keith Herrmann, said: ‘Young people in schools and colleges need professional support to help them make informed choices about subjects to study, qualification pathways and routes into employment. Professional careers advisers have a crucial role in working with schools and employers to provide brokerage, manage careers programmes and provide professional career guidance.’

The Careers Alliance paper notes that Government policy statements have set up an unhelpful dichotomy between the career support provided by careers advisers and the career learning opportunities that are provided by interactions with employers. In contrast, the report explains how the roles of employers and professional careers advisers are distinctive and complementary.

Ongoing disconnect between employers and schools
Commenting on the report, Dame Ruth Silver, Chair of the Careers Alliance, said: ‘There remains a disconnect between education and the world of work. But it is unhelpful for Ministers to suggest that employers can do it all. We ask employer bodies to endorse this call by the Careers Alliance for partnership working to get careers guidance in schools and colleges right.’

Sorting out career guidance in schools and colleges is clearly an urgent issue. Tony Moloney, Head of UK Education & Skills at National Grid, said: ‘Employers and working people can help young people by providing information, inspiration and advice about the world of work. Employers can provide work placements, visits, inspiring talks and can help with CV writing workshops, mock interviews and enterprise programmes.’

Getting the balance right
Professor Tony Watts, a leading international expert on career guidance and CSSA adviser, said: ‘If employer contributions are to be effective, they require logistical support, curriculum space, and receptive schools and young people. They also need to be an integral part of well-planned careers programmes.’

Commenting on the report, Dr Tessa Stone, CEO of Brightside and Chair of the Bridge Group, said: ‘We welcome this report from the Careers Alliance as it clearly spells out the distinctive contributions of employers and careers advisers. The employers we work with are actively engaged in working with schools and colleges. They value the role of professional careers advisers in managing careers education and guidance programmes within schools which incorporate and support the contributions of employers and people at work, so enhancing their value and ensuring their effectiveness.’

The Careers Alliance report concludes that employers (and people at work) and careers advisers both have distinctive and complementary contributions to make to the career development and career planning of young people. Working together, within a planned programme of careers education and guidance, they can provide far more effective help to young people than either could do on their own.

Context
Leading UK employers, unions, and skills and education providers are calling for more collaboration between schools, employers and careers advisers to give better careers advice to young people. Too often, young people are bombarded by a hoard of information online and from employers, from their peers and from their school or college.

Teachers can’t be expected to do it alone, nor should employers be expected to shoulder the sole responsibility. Employers working with schools are crucial to providing opportunities for students to see what working life is like. Professional careers advisers need to work with schools and employers to help young people learn about their options, such as apprenticeships and work experience.

The Government has said a lot about careers advice lately. Stubbornly high youth unemployment at around 1 million continues to be a problem despite numerous Government schemes. A call by the British Chambers of Commerce for the Chancellor, George Osborne, to put young people at the heart of the next budget highlights the importance of getting young people into work.

Besides improving youth employment, preparing young people for the world of work is crucial. The findings of a City & Guilds survey of 1,000 employers shows that almost 80% of employers think work experience is essential to ensuring young people are ready for work, yet 60% of employers remain uncertain on how to deliver the most effective work experience placements and would welcome guidelines and support.

The Careers Alliance welcomes the recently launched UKCES and CIPD employer guides on making work experience work for young people and employers. These reports offer practical advice to employers about offering high-quality work experience and encourage more employers to get involved. Work experience opportunities can help young people learn about the world of work, open their eyes to the range and variety of career opportunities open to them, and connect their learning at school or college to the world of work.

For more information or interviews, please contact:
Keith Herrmann
Convenor, Careers Sector Stakeholders Alliance
T: 079 00 697 544
E: kherrmann@me.com

– Ends –

CSSA Briefing Note 13 available at:

https://careersalliance.wordpress.com/2014/02/23/cssa-briefing-note-13/


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CSSA Briefing Note 13

BN13 CoverThe Roles of Employers and Career Professionals in Providing Career Support to Young People in Schools and Colleges

The Careers Alliance has previously called for more employer engagement in careers education and work-related learning in schools and colleges, and has emphasised the importance of improved co-ordination between employers, professional careers advisers and schools/colleges.

The Education Select Committee welcomed ‘the Government’s support for the increased involvement of local employers in careers guidance in schools, which is vital for effective careers provision’. It added: ‘We recommend that schools be required to set out in their careers plans their arrangements with local employers and how they intend to enhance them.’

Yet Ofsted found that ‘[l]inks with employers were the weakest aspect of career guidance in the 60 schools visited. About two thirds of the schools reported that they had cut down on their work experience provision… for budgetary reasons and because of the recommendation in the Wolf report.’

Besides improving youth employment, preparing young people for the world of work is crucial. Yet the findings of a City & Guilds survey of 1,000 employers shows that almost 80% of employers think work experience is essential to ensuring young people are ready for work, yet 60% of employers remain uncertain on how to deliver the most effective work experience placements and would welcome guidelines and support.

The Careers Alliance welcomes the recently launched UKCES and CIPD employer guides on making work experience work for young people and employers. These reports offer practical advice to employers about offering high-quality work experience and encourage more employers to get involved. Work experience opportunities can help young people learn about the world of work, open their eyes to the range and variety of career opportunities open to them, and connect their learning at school or college to the world of work.

More than ‘inspiration’ needed

However, more is needed than ‘inspiring young people’. Young people in schools and colleges need professional support to help them make informed choices about subjects to study, qualification pathways and routes into employment. Professional careers advisers have a crucial role in working with schools and employers to provide brokerage, manage careers programmes and provide professional career guidance.

The Careers Alliance paper explains how the roles of employers and professional careers advisers are distinctive and complementary when Government policy statements have set up an unhelpful dichotomy between the career support provided by careers advisers and the career learning opportunities that are provided by interactions with employers.

Briefing Note 13 Role of Employers & Career Professionals in CEIAG